How Schools and Classrooms Have Changed

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Содержание
  1. 1944: A student named Dan Moss presented the news of D-Day to a classroom of younger students.
  2. 1947: Road signs in driver’s ed looked different back then.
  3. 1950: Students listened to a radio broadcast.
  4. 1954: Schools began to integrate after the Supreme Court ruled that segregation was unconstitutional.
  5. 1955: An integrated classroom in Kentucky posed for a photo.
  6. 1956: Black students at Clinton High School in Tennessee sat at the back of the classroom.
  7. 1957: Arkansas National Guardsmen stood guard at Little Rock’s Central High School to prevent violence over attendance at the school by nine Black students.
  8. 1958: Virginia public schools closed to protest integration, forcing students to learn in improvised classrooms.
  9. 1959: Tensions around integration continued.
  10. 1960: Schoolchildren in Manhattan saluted the flag.
  11. 1961: One-room schoolhouses were still in use in some parts of the US.
  12. 1963: After public schools in Virginia’s Prince Edward County remained closed, the Prince Edward Free School Association provided schooling to Black students.
  13. 1975: A student at Atlantic County Vocational School in Atlantic City, New Jersey, got married during class.
  14. 1995: Classrooms at a Pennsylvania elementary school included children with and without disabilities.
  15. 1996: A student at J. Hayden Johnson Junior High School in Washington, DC, took notes during a single-sex class.
  16. 2000: Virtual classrooms and online school gained popularity.
  17. 2003: Sixth-graders worked together on the computer in their English class in Kimberly, Idaho.
  18. 2008: Students from the Louisa May Alcott Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois, watered herbs in the school’s garden.
  19. 2015: Students ate breakfast at the Stanley Mosk Elementary School in Los Angeles, California.

1944: A student named Dan Moss presented the news of D-Day to a classroom of younger students.

On D-Day, older students at a school in Chicago, Illinois, heard broadcasts, rewrote them for primary students, and reported to classrooms throughout the school.

Giving the day’s news.

AP


On D-Day, older students at a school in Chicago, Illinois, heard broadcasts, rewrote them for primary students, and reported to classrooms throughout the school.

1947: Road signs in driver’s ed looked different back then.

A driver's ed class in 1947

Driver’s ed.

AP


A driving class at Chicago’s Lane Technical High School learned the meaning of highway signs and signals in 1947.

1950: Students listened to a radio broadcast.

Students listening to a radio broadcast in 1950

Listening to a radio broadcast.

AP


A class at Russell High school in Atlanta, Georgia, listened to a radio broadcast coming from the Atlanta School system’s own radio broadcasting station in 1950.

1954: Schools began to integrate after the Supreme Court ruled that segregation was unconstitutional.

school 1954

Integration.

AP


This 1954 photo was taken on the first day of non-segregated schools for teachers and pupils in the District of Columbia public school system. Ella J. Rice was the only Black teacher in the school.

1955: An integrated classroom in Kentucky posed for a photo.

Griffin School in Kentucky in 1955.

Griffin School in Kentucky.

AP


Six Black children completed their first week at Griffin School in 1955, the first Kentucky public school to attempt integration.

1956: Black students at Clinton High School in Tennessee sat at the back of the classroom.

Black students at Clinton High School in Tennessee sat at the back of the classroom in 1956

Clinton High School in Tennessee.

Gene Herrick/AP


A Black student sat inside a classroom at the newly integrated school in Clinton, Tennessee, in 1956. There were only 12 Black students attending the school at the time, which had been the scene of minor violence as a result of integration, according to AP.

1957: Arkansas National Guardsmen stood guard at Little Rock’s Central High School to prevent violence over attendance at the school by nine Black students.

Arkansas National Guardsmen stand guard at Little Rock's Central High School in 1957

Arkansas National Guardsmen.

AP


The students became known as the «Little Rock Nine.»

1958: Virginia public schools closed to protest integration, forcing students to learn in improvised classrooms.

A teacher teaches in an improvised classroom in 1958

An improvised classroom.

Harvey Georges/AP


Gaylord Gibson taught language arts to high school seniors in Front Royal, Virginia, in an improvised classroom located in an old youth center building.

1959: Tensions around integration continued.

school 1959

A friendly gesture.

Bill Hudson/AP


Jefferson Thomas, the only Black student in Central High School, spoke with a white student as they left the school with other pupils. Thomas said it is the first time a student chatted with him in such a friendly manner outside the classroom in Little Rock, Arkansas, in 1959.

1960: Schoolchildren in Manhattan saluted the flag.

Schoolchildren in Manhattan salute the American flag in 1960.

Saluting the flag.

Keystone View/FPG/Getty Images


A group of children saluted the American flag at a school in the Chinatown area of Manhattan, New York, in 1960.

1961: One-room schoolhouses were still in use in some parts of the US.

A one-room schoolhouse in 1961

A one-room schoolhouse.

AP


Children played outside of the one-room school house at Madison, Maryland, in 1961. There was an assembly room in addition to the single classroom.

1963: After public schools in Virginia’s Prince Edward County remained closed, the Prince Edward Free School Association provided schooling to Black students.

school 1963

Farmville, Virginia.

Henry Burroughs/AP


White students in Prince Edward County moved to newly-established private schools when the public schools remained closed rather than integrate, leaving Black students without schooling. The Prince Edward Free School Association filled that gap by leasing the closed public school buildings and starting schools of their own such as the Mary E. Branch number one school in Farmville, Virginia, in 1963.

1975: A student at Atlantic County Vocational School in Atlantic City, New Jersey, got married during class.

A wedding in an Atlantic County Vocational School classroom in 1975.

A wedding.

AP


Gary E. Butler, left, exchanged rings with his bride, Christine N. McDuffie, during their wedding in an Atlantic County Vocational School classroom in 1975. The bride was a student there and didn’t want to miss a day of training.

1995: Classrooms at a Pennsylvania elementary school included children with and without disabilities.

school 1995

Inclusion.

Paul Vathis/AP


Eight-year-old Ricky Lattimer lay down on an alphabet mat in a kindergarten class at W.R. Croman Elementary School in Troy, Pennsylvania, accompanied by his support aide and physcal therapist. Seated at left is Sally Van Noy, learning support aide. Lattimer was one of the students with disabilities included in regular classrooms at the school. 

1996: A student at J. Hayden Johnson Junior High School in Washington, DC, took notes during a single-sex class.

school 1996

Single-sex classes.

Ruth Fremson/AP


Single-sex schools have always existed, but teaching boys math, science and English separately from girls was new in public schools. More than a dozen states tested the concept.

2000: Virtual classrooms and online school gained popularity.

A girl in a pink shirt and overalls sits in front of her computer in 2000

School from home.

Dave Weaver/AP


Sarah Dicke, a student at Lincoln High School in Lincoln, Nebraska, used a virtual classroom in which all the material for the class are online, and communicated with her teacher via email. She was one of a growing number of students turning to the internet to complete courses required for high school graduation or to get an early start on college. 

2003: Sixth-graders worked together on the computer in their English class in Kimberly, Idaho.

Students point at a computer screen in 2003

English class on computers.

Troy Maben/AP


At Kimberly Middle School, the school’s sixth-grade classes were divided up into separate classes, one for boys and one for girls, for the core classes of math, science, English, and social studies. Administrators said that there were less classroom problems as a result of the change. 

2008: Students from the Louisa May Alcott Elementary School in Chicago, Illinois, watered herbs in the school’s garden.

Student watering the school garden in 2008

Watering the school garden.

Nam Y. Huh/AP


The garden, sponsored by the nonprofit Organic School Project, was part of a larger national movement to teach children healthy eating.

2015: Students ate breakfast at the Stanley Mosk Elementary School in Los Angeles, California.

Students eating breakfast in class in 2015

Eating breakfast in class.

Nick Ut/AP


The number of breakfasts served in the nation’s schools doubled in the last two decades, a surge driven largely by a change in how districts deliver the food. Instead of providing low-income students free or reduced-price meals in the cafeteria, they’re increasingly serving all children in the classroom. 



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